WordPress.com vs WordPress.org

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. That said, I never recommend a product or service that I don’t personally endorse for growing your business.

Many new bloggers struggle to decide (or differentiate) between WordPress.com vs WordPress.org.

While they may look similar at first glance, they’re very different and choosing the wrong platform could impact on your long-term success as a blogger.

Most people fit into one of two camps when it comes to starting a blog. They’re either happy to sacrifice a bit of functionality if it means they can set up their blog quicker and more easily, or, they aren’t fazed with a bit of work upfront if it allows them to add more awesome features to keep their audiences engaged and entertained.

WordPress.com is usually viewed as the simple option (with reduced functionality) – everything you need to get started is provided. WordPress.org, however, is often described as the more powerful option (to the supposed detriment of easy setup as it is up to you to find hosting and a domain name).

It doesn’t have to be this way though. Who says you can’t have the best of both worlds; super-easy setup and functionality?

I want to show you that you can.

This post compares the various features of each platform before discussing why I use (and recommend in 99% of cases) WordPress.org. Finally, I’ll show you step-by-step how to install your own WordPress.org blog as quickly and simply as possible – no sacrifices needed.

Functionality Comparison

The following table compares the various advantages and disadvantages of each platform when it comes to functionality:

one-percent-intent-wordpress-themes
Theme Options

The ability to customize the look of your blog by using different themes, for example, free, premium (paid for), or your own custom themes, and whether or not you can modify the look of a theme by altering its code.

WordPress.com

  • You are unable to add custom themes in the Free, Personal or Premium plans, but you can with the Business plan.

    You can use the free themes within the WordPress directory for Free and Personal plans, or you can purchase a premium theme.

    The Premium and Business allow use of unlimited premium themes at no additional cost.

    Advanced design customization of themes, i.e. the ability to modify CSS code, is only available in the Premium and Business themes. The level of customization is severely limited in lower plans.


WordPress.org

  • You have complete flexibility to add custom themes or use any of the free / premium themes which are widely available online.

    Note: premium themes cost extra (the average cost of a premium theme is $57.54).

    You are able to modify themes in any way you see fit - no limitations.

one-percent-intent-wordpress-plugins
Plugin Options

The ability to add plugins to expand the functionality of your blog beyond what is provided by WordPress.com or WordPress.org as standard.

WordPress.com

  • Unable to add plugins in the Free, Personal or Premium plans, but you can with the Business plan.

    To compensate, all plans include ‘Jetpack Essential Features’, which provides some functionality provided by popular WordPress.org plugins such as SEO (search engine optimization), some analytics and the ability to add social sharing to your content.

    Note: Jetpack comes in both free and paid versions, with more functionality being available in more expensive plans.



WordPress.org

  • Complete flexibility to add any plugin to your blog, whether third-party or custom.

    Note: Many plugins are free, but some need to be purchased.


one-percent-intent-wordpress-domain-url-options
Custom Domain Options

The ability to use your own custom URL for your blog, for example www.myblog.com.

WordPress.com

  • Free plans come with a free WordPress subdomain (e.g. yourblog.wordpress.com). You can choose what the subdomain is (e.g. johnsblog.wordpress.com), but you cannot simply have johnsblog.com.

    Personal, Premium and Business plans include a free custom domain name. The only limitation is whether or not your preferred domain name is still available.


WordPress.org

  • No limitations with regard to using a custom domain. Provided your preferred domain name is still available, you can use it on your blog.

    Note: You will usually need to pay extra for a domain when purchasing your hosting package.

one-percent-intent-wordpress-monetization-options
Monetization Options

A comparison of the restrictions on how you can (or cannot) make money via your blog.

WordPress.com

  • Advertising

    WordPress.com has its own advertising platform called WordAds.

    Blogs on a Free or Personal plan cannot sell ads unless they receive a moderate to high level of traffic.

    Premium and Business plans receive immediate and automatic access to WordAds meaning adverts can be displayed immediately.

    Only the Business plan allows third-party ad networks to be manually selected and used, for example Google AdSense.

    Note: Any money earned using WordAds is on a revenue-share basis, i.e. WordPress.com will take a portion of your earnings from selling ads on your blog.

    Additional Note: All Free plans have adverts shown by default. You cannot switch these off and you do not earn any of the revenue generated from these.

    Affiliate Links / Sponsored Posts

    You can add affiliate links and sponsored posts on your WordPress.com blog provided you do not breach the Terms of Service.

    WordPress.com states that “You can add affiliate links to your WordPress.com content as long as the primary purpose of your blog is to create original content”. You will be restricted on the type of affiliate products you can promote.

    WordPress.com does not allow blogs where the vast majority of content is sponsored content.

    eCommerce - Selling Physical / Digital Products, Receiving Donations etc.

    Free, Personal and Premium plans do not provide functionality for adding a store directly to your blog. You can, however, sell products or receive donations indirectly by adding PayPal buttons or links to your content.

    The Business plan allows you to sell directly from your blog using the WooCommerce plugin.


WordPress.org

  • There are no restrictions (except from a legal perspective!) on how you can earn money through your blog.

one-percent-intent-wordpress-seo-search-engine-optimization
SEO Capability

The ability to boost your blog's search engine ranking via various SEO (search engine optimization) techniques.

WordPress.com

  • As standard, WordPress.com provides very limited functionality to improve SEO and increase your blog’s search engine ranking.

    SEO tools are only available in the Premium plan, or where a JetPack Premium or Professional Plan is purchased.


WordPress.org

  • Complete flexibility to install third-party SEO plugins, for example Yoast SEO, to boost your blog’s search engine ranking.

    Related: I cover the specific steps to improve your blog's SEO in the following post: WordPress SEO: The Ultimate Guide

one-percent-intent-wordpress-tracking-analytics
Tracking & Analytics Capability

The ability to track your blog's performance in terms of number of visitors, page views, etc.

WordPress.com

  • As standard, WordPress.com provides very limited analytics in the Free, Personal and Premium plans.

    You can access high-level information only such as how many visitors your blog has received, which posts are the most popular and how many comments you've received, etc.

    You are unable to install more feature-rich analytics applications on these plans given that you can’t install plugins.

    Premium plan customers can make use of Google Analytics for more in-depth tracking and analysis, or they can install an alternative analytics plugin.


WordPress.org

  • You can install Google Analytics or a preferred analytics plugin on your blog to provide detailed tracking statistics.

one-percent-intent-wordpress-membership-site-options
Membership Site Capability

The ability to make sections (or entirety) of your blog only accessible to members.

WordPress.com

  • You cannot create a membership-based website on any of the WordPress.com plans.


WordPress.org

  • You are able to create membership-based websites on WordPress.org, for example, using the MemberPress plugin.

Other Important Comparisons

Besides basic functionality, there are a number of other key factors that you should be aware of when choosing between WordPress.org vs WordPress.com.

These include:

one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-requirements
Installation Requirements

A comparison of how easy it is to setup and install a WordPress.com vs WordPress.org blog.
WordPress.com

  • Installation is quick and simple and all requirements can be completed directly via the WordPress.com website.

WordPress.org

  • Setting up and installing a WordPress.org blog does not need to be difficult or time-consuming.

    I've created a step-by-step guide on how to do it at the bottom of this post (click here to access).

one-percent-intent-wordpress-maintenance-requirements
Maintenance Requirements

A comparison of your requirements in terms of maintaining a WordPress.com vs WordPress.org blog.
WordPress.com

  • There are no backup or update requirements for the software on all plans. WordPress.com takes care of this.

    Plugins on the Business plan can be set to autoupdate.

WordPress.org

  • You are responsible for all update and backup requirements on your blog. Thankfully, this is relatively simple to do.

one-percent-intent-wordpress-terms-of-service
Limiting Terms of Service

Specific terms and conditions which your blog must adhere to.
WordPress.com

  • All WordPress.com blogs must adhere to the Terms of Service.

    Any violations of these and WordPress.com “may terminate your access to all or any part of the Website at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice, effective immediately”.

    This could result in serious repercussions for minor or accidental breaches of the terms and conditions, and leaves your blog at risk of downtime. This is a big risk especially if you will be relying on your blog form a business perspective.

WordPress.org

  • Provided you’re not doing anything illegal (and provided you keep paying for your hosting!), your blog cannot be taken down by anyone other than you.

    You are in complete control of your blog and the content you publish.

one-percent-intent-wordpress-branding-options
Branding Requirements

Any branding requirements that will be enforced on your blog.
WordPress.com

  • All Free plans include a ‘Powered by WordPress’ link on each webpage. This cannot be removed and is in addition to the ads which WordPress.com shows automatically on Free plans (and for which you earn no revenue).

    WordPress branding can be removed on each of the paid plans (Personal, Premium and Business).

WordPress.org

  • WordPress.org blogs are free from any compulsory branding requirements.

Cost Comparison

The final aspect to compare is the basic cost of hosting a blog using WordPress.com vs WordPress.org.

As shown in the table below, WordPress.com offers plans which range from free to $300 per year. This covers everything including a .com domain (or a WordPress sub-domain on free plans), and access to free or premium themes depending on the plan you choose.

The primary costs for a WordPress.org blog are for hosting and registering a domain name. These are shown below based on current introductory pricing (standard pricing applies once this introductory offer finishes) when you signup to host your WordPress.org blog using Siteground (which I use and recommend).

Aside from this, you will need to pay for a premium theme for WordPress.org if you want one (premium themes cost $57.54 on average), or you can use any of the free themes offered instead.

WordPress.com
WordPress.org (via Siteground hosting)


  • $0.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free WordPress sub-domain)


  • N/A:

  • No free plan available.



  • $4.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free .com domain)



  • from $3.95 per month

  • (Domain not included - available separately from $15.95 per year)



  • $8.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free .com domain)



  • from $5.95 per month

  • (Domain not included - available separately from $15.95 per year)



  • $25.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free .com domain)



  • from $11.95 per month

  • (Domain not included - available separately from $15.95 per year)

  • My Recommendation – WordPress.org

    If you’re happy enough creating a small hobby blog that you aren’t interested in making money from, WordPress.com could be a suitable option in the free or lower-priced packages.

    If, however, you’re serious about growing your blog, it will cost substantially more for the first year for a WordPress.com site with all the features you’ll need from the top Business plan ($300.00).

    This is in stark contrast to Siteground’s lowest package (StartUp – from only $3.95 a month for the first year without domain registration) that would still allow you to enjoy all the WordPress.org features and benefits listed above.

    For this reason, my opinion is that there isn’t enough value for money to be had from starting off on the WordPress.com platform.

    Given that WordPress.org also allows you to draw the benefits of full monetization from your blog while having complete control and ownership of the content you produce, the WordPress.org platform with hosting from Siteground was the obvious choice for my blog.

    Why I Use (and Thoroughly Recommend) Siteground Hosting

    Please note: as mentioned above, some of the links in this post are affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item I will receive an affiliate commission, however, I only recommend products and services that I truly believe will be of benefit to my readers.

    Siteground provides all the features and support that I need to build, grow and maintain my blog. The following are just some of the benefits:

    • Officially Recommended – WordPress.org recommends Siteground for hosting.

    • Easy Installation Installing your blog is super-quick and easy (see the step-by-step guide below).

    • Fast Loading – Every plan includes fantastic features to ensure your blog loads as quickly as possible.

    • Added Extras – Free extras are included in all plans, for example, an SSL certificate (to increase your blog’s security) and access to Cloudflare’s CDN (to make your blog load faster).

    Web Hosting

    WordPress.com vs. WordPress.org

    Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. That said, I never recommend a product or service that I don’t personally endorse for growing your business.

    Many new bloggers struggle to decide (or differentiate) between WordPress.com vs WordPress.org.

    While they may look similar at first glance, they’re very different and choosing the wrong platform could impact on your long-term success as a blogger.

    Most people fit into one of two camps when it comes to starting a blog. They’re either happy to sacrifice a bit of functionality if it means they can set up their blog quicker and more easily, or, they aren’t fazed with a bit of work upfront if it allows them to add more awesome features to keep their audiences engaged and entertained.

    WordPress.com is usually viewed as the simple option (with reduced functionality) – everything you need to get started is provided. WordPress.org, however, is often described as the more powerful option (to the supposed detriment of easy setup as it is up to you to find hosting and a domain name).

    It doesn’t have to be this way though. Who says you can’t have the best of both worlds; super-easy setup and functionality?

    I want to show you that you can.

    This post compares the various features of each platform before discussing why I use (and recommend in 99% of cases) WordPress.org. Finally, I’ll show you step-by-step how to install your own WordPress.org blog as quickly and simply as possible – no sacrifices needed.

    Functionality Comparison

    The following table compares the various advantages and disadvantages of each platform when it comes to functionality:

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-themes
    Theme Options

    The ability to customize the look of your blog by using different themes, for example, free, premium (paid for), or your own custom themes, and whether or not you can modify the look of a theme by altering its code.

    WordPress.com

    • You are unable to add custom themes in the Free, Personal or Premium plans, but you can with the Business plan.

      You can use the free themes within the WordPress directory for Free and Personal plans, or you can purchase a premium theme.

      The Premium and Business allow use of unlimited premium themes at no additional cost.

      Advanced design customization of themes, i.e. the ability to modify CSS code, is only available in the Premium and Business themes. The level of customization is severely limited in lower plans.


    WordPress.org

    • You have complete flexibility to add custom themes or use any of the free / premium themes which are widely available online.

      Note: premium themes cost extra (the average cost of a premium theme is $57.54).

      You are able to modify themes in any way you see fit - no limitations.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-plugins
    Plugin Options

    The ability to add plugins to expand the functionality of your blog beyond what is provided by WordPress.com or WordPress.org as standard.

    WordPress.com

    • Unable to add plugins in the Free, Personal or Premium plans, but you can with the Business plan.

      To compensate, all plans include ‘Jetpack Essential Features’, which provides some functionality provided by popular WordPress.org plugins such as SEO (search engine optimization), some analytics and the ability to add social sharing to your content.

      Note: Jetpack comes in both free and paid versions, with more functionality being available in more expensive plans.


    WordPress.org

    • Complete flexibility to add any plugin to your blog, whether third-party or custom.

      Note: Many plugins are free, but some need to be purchased.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-domain-url-options
    Custom Domain Options

    The ability to use your own custom URL for your blog, for example www.myblog.com.

    WordPress.com

    • Free plans come with a free WordPress subdomain (e.g. yourblog.wordpress.com). You can choose what the subdomain is (e.g. johnsblog.wordpress.com), but you cannot simply have johnsblog.com.

      Personal, Premium and Business plans include a free custom domain name. The only limitation is whether or not your preferred domain name is still available.


    WordPress.org

    • No limitations with regard to using a custom domain. Provided your preferred domain name is still available, you can use it on your blog.

      Note: You will usually need to pay extra for a domain when purchasing your hosting package.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-monetization-options
    Monetization Options

    A comparison of the restrictions on how you can (or cannot) make money via your blog.

    WordPress.com

    • Advertising

      WordPress.com has its own advertising platform called WordAds.

      Blogs on a Free or Personal plan cannot sell ads unless they receive a moderate to high level of traffic.

      Premium and Business plans receive immediate and automatic access to WordAds meaning adverts can be displayed immediately.

      Only the Business plan allows third-party ad networks to be manually selected and used, for example Google AdSense.

      Note: Any money earned using WordAds is on a revenue-share basis, i.e. WordPress.com will take a portion of your earnings from selling ads on your blog.

      Additional Note: All Free plans have adverts shown by default. You cannot switch these off and you do not earn any of the revenue generated from these.

      Affiliate Links / Sponsored Posts

      You can add affiliate links and sponsored posts on your WordPress.com blog provided you do not breach the Terms of Service.

      WordPress.com states that “You can add affiliate links to your WordPress.com content as long as the primary purpose of your blog is to create original content”. You will be restricted on the type of affiliate products you can promote.

      WordPress.com does not allow blogs where the vast majority of content is sponsored content.

      eCommerce - Selling Physical / Digital Products, Receiving Donations etc.

      Free, Personal and Premium plans do not provide functionality for adding a store directly to your blog. You can, however, sell products or receive donations indirectly by adding PayPal buttons or links to your content.

      The Business plan allows you to sell directly from your blog using the WooCommerce plugin.


    WordPress.org

    • There are no restrictions (except from a legal perspective!) on how you can earn money through your blog.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-seo-search-engine-optimization
    SEO Capability

    The ability to boost your blog's search engine ranking via various SEO (search engine optimization) techniques.

    WordPress.com

    • As standard, WordPress.com provides very limited functionality to improve SEO and increase your blog’s search engine ranking.

      SEO tools are only available in the Premium plan, or where a JetPack Premium or Professional Plan is purchased.


    WordPress.org

    • Complete flexibility to install third-party SEO plugins, for example Yoast SEO, to boost your blog’s search engine ranking.

      Related: I cover the specific steps to improve your blog's SEO in the following post: WordPress SEO: The Ultimate Guide

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-tracking-analytics
    Tracking & Analytics Capability

    The ability to track your blog's performance in terms of number of visitors, page views, etc.

    WordPress.com

    • As standard, WordPress.com provides very limited analytics in the Free, Personal and Premium plans.

      You can access high-level information only such as how many visitors your blog has received, which posts are the most popular and how many comments you've received, etc.

      You are unable to install more feature-rich analytics applications on these plans given that you can’t install plugins.

      Premium plan customers can make use of Google Analytics for more in-depth tracking and analysis, or they can install an alternative analytics plugin.


    WordPress.org

    • You can install Google Analytics or a preferred analytics plugin on your blog to provide detailed tracking statistics.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-membership-site-options
    Membership Site Capability

    The ability to make sections (or entirety) of your blog only accessible to members.

    WordPress.com

    • You cannot create a membership-based website on any of the WordPress.com plans.


    WordPress.org

    • You are able to create membership-based websites on WordPress.org, for example, using the MemberPress plugin.

    Other Important Comparisons

    Besides basic functionality, there are a number of other key factors that you should be aware of when choosing between WordPress.org vs WordPress.com.

    These include:

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-requirements
    Installation Requirements

    A comparison of how easy it is to setup and install a WordPress.com vs WordPress.org blog.
    WordPress.com

    • Installation is quick and simple and all requirements can be completed directly via the WordPress.com website.

    WordPress.org

    • Setting up and installing a WordPress.org blog does not need to be difficult or time-consuming.

      I've created a step-by-step guide on how to do it at the bottom of this post (click here to access).

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-maintenance-requirements
    Maintenance Requirements

    A comparison of your requirements in terms of maintaining a WordPress.com vs WordPress.org blog.
    WordPress.com

    • There are no backup or update requirements for the software on all plans. WordPress.com takes care of this.

      Plugins on the Business plan can be set to autoupdate.

    WordPress.org

    • You are responsible for all update and backup requirements on your blog. Thankfully, this is relatively simple to do.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-terms-of-service
    Limiting Terms of Service

    Specific terms and conditions which your blog must adhere to.
    WordPress.com

    • All WordPress.com blogs must adhere to the Terms of Service.

      Any violations of these and WordPress.com “may terminate your access to all or any part of the Website at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice, effective immediately”.

      This could result in serious repercussions for minor or accidental breaches of the terms and conditions, and leaves your blog at risk of downtime. This is a big risk especially if you will be relying on your blog form a business perspective.
    WordPress.org

    • Provided you’re not doing anything illegal (and provided you keep paying for your hosting!), your blog cannot be taken down by anyone other than you.

      You are in complete control of your blog and the content you publish.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-branding-options
    Branding Requirements

    Any branding requirements that will be enforced on your blog.
    WordPress.com

    • All Free plans include a ‘Powered by WordPress’ link on each webpage. This cannot be removed and is in addition to the ads which WordPress.com shows automatically on Free plans (and for which you earn no revenue).

      WordPress branding can be removed on each of the paid plans (Personal, Premium and Business).

    WordPress.org

    • WordPress.org blogs are free from any compulsory branding requirements.

    Cost Comparison

    The final aspect to compare is the basic cost of hosting a blog using WordPress.com vs WordPress.org.

    As shown in the table below, WordPress.com offers plans which range from free to $300 per year. This covers everything including a .com domain (or a WordPress sub-domain on free plans), and access to free or premium themes depending on the plan you choose.

    The primary costs for a WordPress.org blog are for hosting and registering a domain name. These are shown below based on current introductory pricing (standard pricing applies once this introductory offer finishes) when you signup to host your WordPress.org blog using Siteground (which I use and recommend).

    Aside from this, you will need to pay for a premium theme for WordPress.org if you want one (premium themes cost $57.54 on average), or you can use any of the free themes offered instead.

    WordPress.com
    WordPress.org (via Siteground hosting)


  • $0.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free WordPress sub-domain)


  • N/A:

  • No free plan available.



  • $4.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free .com domain)



  • from $3.95 per month

  • (Domain not included - available separately from $15.95 per year)



  • $8.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free .com domain)



  • from $5.95 per month

  • (Domain not included - available separately from $15.95 per year)



  • $25.00 per month

  • (Plan includes a free .com domain)



  • from $11.95 per month

  • (Domain not included - available separately from $15.95 per year)

  • My Recommendation – WordPress.org

    If you’re happy enough creating a small hobby blog that you aren’t interested in making money from, WordPress.com could be a suitable option in the free or lower-priced packages.

    If, however, you’re serious about growing your blog, it will cost substantially more for the first year for a WordPress.com site with all the features you’ll need from the top Business plan ($300.00).

    This is in stark contrast to Siteground’s lowest package (StartUp – from only $3.95 a month for the first year without domain registration) that would still allow you to enjoy all the WordPress.org features and benefits listed above.

    For this reason, my opinion is that there isn’t enough value for money to be had from starting off on the WordPress.com platform.

    Given that WordPress.org also allows you to draw the benefits of full monetization from your blog while having complete control and ownership of the content you produce, the WordPress.org platform with hosting from Siteground was the obvious choice for my blog.

    Why I Use (and Thoroughly Recommend) Siteground Hosting

    Please note: as mentioned above, some of the links in this post are affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item I will receive an affiliate commission, however, I only recommend products and services that I truly believe will be of benefit to my readers.

    Siteground provides all the features and support that I need to build, grow and maintain my blog. The following are just some of the benefits:

    • Officially Recommended – WordPress.org recommends Siteground for hosting.

    • Easy Installation Installing your blog is super-quick and easy (see the step-by-step guide below).

    • Fast Loading – Every plan includes fantastic features to ensure your blog loads as quickly as possible.

    • Added Extras – Free extras are included in all plans, for example, an SSL certificate (to increase your blog’s security) and access to Cloudflare’s CDN (to make your blog load faster).

    Web Hosting

    How to Install a Self-Hosted (WordPress.org) Blog Using Siteground

    Step One:

    Click here to see Siteground’s hosting packages.

    Choose your preferred hosting package and click the ‘Order Now’ button.

    (I personally use ‘GrowBig’ as I wanted the option of being able to create and host multiple websites).

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-for-wordpress-image-2

    Step Two:

    Next, you need to decide on the domain name that you’d like for your blog.

    You can either choose a new domain name, or enter an existing domain if you already have one.

    Click ‘Proceed’.

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-select-domain-image

    Step Three:

    If you’ve chosen a new domain name and it is available, you’ll see a congratulations message as shown in the screenshot below (if not, you’ll need to go back a step and choose a new domain name).

    Fill out the form on this page. There will be a number of extra services listed towards the bottom of the form that I cover in the next step.

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-for-wordpress-domain-available-image

    Step Four:

    There are a number of extra services which you can add to your hosting package:

    • ‘Domain Registration’ will automatically be selected if you’ve chosen to register a new domain with Siteground.
    • ‘Domain Privacy’ prevents your personal details from being publicly available in the WHOIS database and makes the contact information entered for your domain name private.
    • ‘SG Site Scanner’ provides malware detection and let’s you know if your website has been messed with by hackers.

    (I personally opted for both domain privacy and the SG Site Scanner for pease of mind when purchasing hosting with Siteground, however, they aren’t mandatory).

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-extra-services-image

    Step Five:

    Once you’ve registered for an account and hosting plan, you need to login by using the button on the top-right of your browser window.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-siteground-hosting-login-img

    Step Six:

    Once logged in, click ‘My Accounts’ from the tab bar below the Siteground logo.

    Next, click ‘Manage Account’.

    (Note: my hosting package shows two websites; my main OnePercentIntent domain and a secondary. Yours will probably only show the domain you just signed up for – this is normal).

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-siteground-hosting-my-account-img

    Step Seven:

    Click on the red button that says ‘Go to cPanel’.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-siteground-hosting-control-panel-access-img

    Step Eight:

    Scroll down the page until you reach a heading which reads ‘AUTOINSTALLERS’.

    Click on the WordPress icon under this heading.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-img

    Step Nine:

    Click the blue install button.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-click-to-install-img

    Step Ten:

    Choose the required ‘Protocol’ from the dropdown list.

    I personally use HTTPS (I have Siteground’s free Let’s Encrypt SSL certificate installed which allows this), as it provides greater website security and also provides a ranking boost by Google. You can, however, use HTTP only if preferred.

    Check that the domain is correct in the ‘Choose Domain’ dropdown box.

    Leave the ‘In Directory’ field blank.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-click-to-install-settings-img

    Step Eleven:

    Scroll further down the page from where you selected your protocol requirement (HTTPS, HTTP, etc.) and from where you checked your domain.

    There are a number of settings that you’ll want to change under the ‘Site Settings’ heading. I’ve put a star beside these in the image below.

    • Site Name: Enter your blog’s name, for example, Angie’s Blog
    • Site Description: Enter a brief description about your blog.
    • Admin Username: Change this to something memorable (I personally use an email address).
    • Admin Password: Change this to something memorable yet secure.
    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-click-to-install-settings-2-img

    Step Twelve:

    Take a note of the ‘Administrative URL’ which is provided once installation is complete.

    This is where you’ll actually build your blog from, so you’ll be using it regularly. It’s a good idea to add this address to your bookmarks.

    If you’ve gone past this step and forgotten your admin URL, don’t worry, simply add “/wp-admin/” to the end of your chosen domain name (e.g. http://www.myblog.com/wp-admin/) and you’ll be able to access it.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-successfully-installed-img

    And Finally…

    Well done! Give yourself a pat on the back. You’ve now installed WordPress and you’re ready to begin building your blog.

    Click on your ‘Administrative URL’ that I pointed out in the last step to access the admin area for your new blog.

    I’ve added some orange stars in the image below against the functions you’ll probably be most interested in at the start, for example:

    • ‘Customize Your Site’: Allows basic customization of your blog’s appearance, for example color schemes.
    • ‘change your theme completely’: You can change your theme from here. I use and recommend the Avada theme, which includes a simple drag-and-drop editor and visual builder to make customizing your site as easy as possible without needing to know how to code. Click here to read my review of the Avada theme.
    • ‘Write your first blog post’: Get started with writing a new blog post.
    • ‘Plugins’: Located in the sidebar, this is where you’ll manage your plugins from.
    one-percent-intent-siteground-hosting-change-wordpress-theme-img

    I hope you find this guide useful.

    Let me know in the comments section if you have any questions, issues or concerns and I’ll try my best to help you.

    Recommended: Now that you’ve installed WordPress, the following guide will provide you with all the information and advice you need to grow traffic to your new blog: WordPress SEO: The Ultimate Guide.

    Thanks,

    – Jonathan

    How to Install a Self-Hosted (WordPress.org) Blog Using Siteground

    Step One:

    Click here to see Siteground’s hosting packages.

    Choose your preferred hosting package and click the ‘Order Now’ button.

    (I personally use ‘GrowBig’ as I wanted the option of being able to create and host multiple websites).

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-for-wordpress-image-2

    Step Two:

    Next, you need to decide on the domain name that you’d like for your blog.

    You can either choose a new domain name, or enter an existing domain if you already have one.

    Click ‘Proceed’.

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-select-domain-image

    Step Three:

    If you’ve chosen a new domain name and it is available, you’ll see a congratulations message as shown in the screenshot below (if not, you’ll need to go back a step and choose a new domain name).

    Fill out the form on this page. There will be a number of extra services listed towards the bottom of the form that I cover in the next step.

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-for-wordpress-domain-available-image

    Step Four:

    There are a number of extra services which you can add to your hosting package:

    • ‘Domain Registration’ will automatically be selected if you’ve chosen to register a new domain with Siteground.
    • ‘Domain Privacy’ prevents your personal details from being publicly available in the WHOIS database and makes the contact information entered for your domain name private.
    • ‘SG Site Scanner’ provides malware detection and let’s you know if your website has been messed with by hackers.

    (I personally opted for both domain privacy and the SG Site Scanner for pease of mind when purchasing hosting with Siteground, however, they aren’t mandatory).

    one-percent-intent-choose-siteground-hosting-plan-extra-services-image

    Step Five:

    Once you’ve registered for an account and hosting plan, you need to login by using the button on the top-right of your browser window.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-siteground-hosting-login-img

    Step Six:

    Once logged in, click ‘My Accounts’ from the tab bar below the Siteground logo.

    Next, click ‘Manage Account’.

    (Note: my hosting package shows two websites; my main OnePercentIntent domain and a secondary. Yours will probably only show the domain you just signed up for – this is normal).

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-siteground-hosting-my-account-img

    Step Seven:

    Click on the red button that says ‘Go to cPanel’.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installation-siteground-hosting-control-panel-access-img

    Step Eight:

    Scroll down the page until you reach a heading which reads ‘AUTOINSTALLERS’.

    Click on the WordPress icon under this heading.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-img

    Step Nine:

    Click the blue install button.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-click-to-install-img

    Step Ten:

    Choose the required ‘Protocol’ from the dropdown list.

    I personally use HTTPS (I have Siteground’s free Let’s Encrypt SSL certificate installed which allows this), as it provides greater website security and also provides a ranking boost by Google. You can, however, use HTTP only if preferred.

    Check that the domain is correct in the ‘Choose Domain’ dropdown box.

    Leave the ‘In Directory’ field blank.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-click-to-install-settings-img

    Step Eleven:

    Scroll further down the page from where you selected your protocol requirement (HTTPS, HTTP, etc.) and from where you checked your domain.

    There are a number of settings that you’ll want to change under the ‘Site Settings’ heading. I’ve put a star beside these in the image below.

    • Site Name: Enter your blog’s name, for example, Angie’s Blog
    • Site Description: Enter a brief description about your blog.
    • Admin Username: Change this to something memorable (I personally use an email address).
    • Admin Password: Change this to something memorable yet secure.
    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-click-to-install-settings-2-img

    Step Twelve:

    Take a note of the ‘Administrative URL’ which is provided once installation is complete.

    This is where you’ll actually build your blog from, so you’ll be using it regularly. It’s a good idea to add this address to your bookmarks.

    If you’ve gone past this step and forgotten your admin URL, don’t worry, simply add “/wp-admin/” to the end of your chosen domain name (e.g. http://www.myblog.com/wp-admin/) and you’ll be able to access it.

    one-percent-intent-wordpress-installer-siteground-hosting-successfully-installed-img

    And Finally…

    Well done! Give yourself a pat on the back. You’ve now installed WordPress and you’re ready to begin building your blog.

    Click on your ‘Administrative URL’ that I pointed out in the last step to access the admin area for your new blog.

    I’ve added some orange stars in the image below against the functions you’ll probably be most interested in at the start, for example:

    • ‘Customize Your Site’: Allows basic customization of your blog’s appearance, for example color schemes.
    • ‘change your theme completely’: You can change your theme from here. I use and recommend the Avada theme, which includes a simple drag-and-drop editor and visual builder to make customizing your site as easy as possible without needing to know how to code. Click here to read my review of the Avada theme.
    • ‘Write your first blog post’: Get started with writing a new blog post.
    • ‘Plugins’: Located in the sidebar, this is where you’ll manage your plugins from.
    one-percent-intent-siteground-hosting-change-wordpress-theme-img

    I hope you find this guide useful.

    Let me know in the comments section if you have any questions, issues or concerns and I’ll try my best to help you.

    Recommended: Now that you’ve installed WordPress, the following guide will provide you with all the information and advice you need to grow traffic to your new blog: WordPress SEO: The Ultimate Guide.

    Thanks,

    – Jonathan

    28 Rules You NEED to Follow to Supercharge Your Blogging Income.

    Get your FREE checklist and email course to find how to consistently earn $1,000+ a month from your blog!

    28 Rules You NEED to Follow to Supercharge Your Blogging Income.

    Get your FREE checklist and email course to find how to consistently earn $1,000+ a month from your blog!

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    Jonathan @ OnePercentIntentRyan Biddulph Recent comment authors
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    Ryan Biddulph
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    Nice breakdown here Jonathan. Dot org all the way for me, from blog ownership, to monetizing and branding potential, to the support community. To be a pro, dot org is the only choice. Tweeted for you buddy.

    Ryan

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