21 Steps to Supercharge Your Pinterest Marketing

Pinterest is widely regarded as being one of the best sources of traffic for bloggers, with around 5% of all online referral traffic coming from the platform. In addition, it has been found to be 80% more viral and 3x more effective at lead generation than Twitter, so from a blog/business perspective you really can’t afford not to master Pinterest.

I know from personal experience, however, that Pinterest can be a tricky beast to tame. There seems to be conflicting advice everywhere, and promises of instant, massive blog traffic growth from a few too-good-to-be-true ‘secrets’ never seem to be too far away.

Trust me; I reckon I’ve tried all the Pinterest tips and tricks available, from high-volume pinning to testing out strategies combining manual and scheduled pinning, nothing seemed to work to increase my profile’s reach and engagement massively, and I couldn’t find a single example of how to make money on Pinterest that actually worked for me.

Thankfully, I’ve found that you can adopt a ‘back to basics’ approach which works. Perhaps the first step below should be to be realistic, as the most important thing you need to realize is that it’s a marathon and not a sprint. There is no such thing as overnight success in any endeavor, and provided you follow the steps below and stay consistent, then you too should be able to grow a Pinterest profile capable of producing the monthly views and blog traffic of some of the profiles you and I both envy.

(Please note: I’m not saying I’m a Pinterest expert by writing this post (far from it!), but I have done a LOT of research by reading pretty much every ‘Pinterest for bloggers’ guide out there, and my profile’s reach is steadily growing. If discussing my experience and what I’ve learned can help even one of my readers save time and make them feel more confident about Pinterest, then I view that as a success!).

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Essential Information in 2018 – What do you need to know?

If you’ve read anything about Pinterest recently, you’ve probably heard about the algorithm update which took effect in 2018.

As a bit of background information, Pinterest introduced a feature known as the ‘smart feed’ in the backend of 2018 (this is just a fancy term for the home feed that shows on your profile’s homepage). It’s called ‘smart’ because it uses an algorithm to ensure that any pins displayed on the home feed are as relevant as possible for a user based on certain criteria, for example, their interests, what they searched for on Pinterest previously, and how ‘quality’ a pin is considered to be, etc.

It isn’t uncommon for the algorithm that drives this to be updated, and that’s what has happened in 2018.

Now, Pinterest is never going to come out and tell us precisely what the algorithm looks for (they’re a business after all, and they need to protect their intellectual property). We can, however, piece together snippets from various sources including Pinterest employees, articles, and our personal experience to build a picture of what works on Pinterest. That’s what I’ve done for this guide.

There are four main areas you need to look at if you want to boost your Pinterest profile’s reach and engagement, and to ultimately get traffic to your blog using the platform. They form the foundations of how to make money on Pinterest.

These include:

  • Domain Quality – An assessment is performed by Pinterest to determine the ‘quality’ of your website. It makes sense for this to be measured because Pinterest would prefer to boost the ranking of pins from authoritative and popular sites versus those associated with spam. Nobody likes spam or clickbait, so by weeding this out, Pinterest hopes (and can expect) to increase user satisfaction and loyalty on the platform.

  • Pin Quality – Nothing new here. Pinterest checks to see how much engagement your pins are getting. The more saves, clicks, comments and tries the better, and Pinterest takes note of this to boost the ranking and visibility of more popular content.

  • Relevance – It’s worth remembering that Pinterest functions as a search engine, so the top priority of the platform is to display pins that relate directly to a user’s interests or their specific search query.

  • Pinner Quality – Pinterest cares more about the quality of the pins you promote on the platform than the quantity. The visibility of your pins will take a hit if you consistently promote low-quality content with little engagement versus more popular content.

I’m going to make it super simple for you and show you the 21 steps that you need to take to meet each of the requirements above.

My advice? Don’t overwhelm yourself – pick a few steps and gradually add more as time goes on. Consistency is the key here.

Let’s dive in…

How to make money on Pinterest:

Learn the steps to get more traffic to your blog, website or business using Pinterest. Both beginner & established Pinterest users will learn helpful tips and tricks and secret hacks on how to grow blog traffic, and how to increase domain quality, pin quality, relevance and pinner quality. Learn how to optimize your pins using SEO & keywords to improve engagement and receive comments, saves and clicks, and find out how important promoted pins are to help boost your blog’s traffic strategy.

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Steps to Increase Domain Quality

As with building a house, your Pinterest profile will be stronger if you build it upon the right foundations. The following steps will boost your domain quality on Pinterest and help you achieve some of the fundamental requirements of successful accounts:

  1. Set up a Business Account

The first step to increasing domain quality is to set up your Pinterest profile as a business account. Don’t worry; it’s completely free.

There are a few reasons why having a Pinterest business account is so important:

  1. You can’t promote products or services, for example via ads, without first agreeing to Pinterest’s Business Terms of Service.
  1. Having a business account allows you to show the name of your business/blog on your profile instead of the default first name and last name (see the image below), which looks far more professional from a business perspective and helps promote brand recognition.
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-increase-domain-authority-business-name
  1. Without a business account, you can’t access essential functionality such as Pinterest Analytics (to see how well your pins are performing), and Promoted Pins or Rich Pins (both of which will help you boost your profile’s reach and engagement).

You can convert from a personal to business account easily without any impact on your existing pins, boards or followers.

You can read about the specific steps here.

  1. Claim Your Website

Claiming your website is an essential step to boosting your engagement on Pinterest. There are a few reasons for this:

  1. Claiming your site is required to unlock Pinterest Analytics (in addition to having a business account as discussed above). This feature is critical to helping you make informed choices about the content you share. I talk more about Pinterest Analytics in Point 18 below.
  1. Once you’ve claimed your site, any pins that come from your blog will have your profile picture attached beside them which will help boost brand visibility and recognition.
  1. Your blog’s URL will now show directly on your profile (see image below). Visitors to your profile can directly follow this link to access your blog.
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-increase-domain-authority-claim-website

Find out how to do it here: How to claim your website on Pinterest.

  1. Use Rich Pins

Rich Pins take a standard pin and pump it full of additional, relevant information. There are a couple of types available:

  • Product Pins
  • Recipe Pins
  • Article Pins
  • App Pins

For example, look at the following recipe pin:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-increase-domain-authority-rich-pins

See all that extra information like cooking time, ingredients, and even the title of the recipe at the top of the pin? You wouldn’t get that on a standard pin.

All told, this additional information will help your pins stand out more against all the noise on Pinterest. Another advantage? Rich Pins extract metadata from your website, meaning that if you change information, for example, the price of a product, the revised price is automatically updated on the Rich Pin.

Find out how to add them here: How to enable rich pins for your blog/website.

Steps to Increase Pin Quality

The quality of your pins is hugely important on Pinterest – you can’t expect people to share something that looks amateur or is full of grammar/spelling mistakes. Complete the following steps to increase the number of saves, clicks, comments and tries on your pins:

  1. Optimize Your Pins

I can’t stress enough how important it is to focus on pinning high quality pins. First impressions count, and if you want your pin to stand out and receive more saves, clicks and comments than the other pins in a user’s feed, there are a number of things you need to do. These include:

When creating pins:

  • Focus on quality – Don’t create pins for the sake of it, but instead focus on providing as much value as possible. The following quote sums up what you need to aim for: “The best Pins represent the best ideas – they’re inspirational and actionable. Create Pins that have a clear audience, and are engaging for that audience” (source).

  • Don’t rush it – Spend as much time as possible creating a pin that you’re proud of. You can use a service like Canva to produce high-quality pins online, they even provide royalty free images, and you can apply filters to quickly and easily modify how your pin looks.

  • Avoid horizontal pins – The general feeling is that you should avoid horizontal pins at all costs – even Pinterest admits that vertical pins work better.

    Horizontal pins won’t show in full on a user’s feed, and if someone needs to click a pin to see it fully and to understand it, well, that’ll be too much hassle. Most group boards prohibit horizontal pins anyway, so make it as easy as possible on yourself and others and stick to vertical pins only.

  • Size matters – There has been a trend recently of creating long, vertical pins that occupy as much space as possible in a Pinterest visitor’s feed, with the general feeling being that these will get the most attention (I have created several pins known as ‘giraffe’ pins – i.e., very tall and thin). Pinterest, however, states that it prefers an aspect ratio of 2:3 for vertical pins (typically 600px wide by 900px high).

    Longer pins will now be cut-off in the feed meaning the entirety of the pin won’t show unless it’s clicked on, and the Pinterest algorithm will reduce how often these pins appear on mobile devices unless they have significant levels of engagement.

    I’m personally sticking to 600px x 900px pins going forward, and I’ll be remaking my existing ‘giraffe’ pins to match Pinterest’s preferred size.

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-optimal-preferred-pin-size
  • Inspire action – Boost the effectiveness of your pins by creating headlines and sub-headlines that people can’t help but engage with. Check out the following guide for tips on writing headlines (yes…I know it’s written specifically for articles, but the tips can easily apply to Pinterest pins too): The Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Powerful Headlines.

    Make people want what you’re offering too. If your pin is promoting a free guide or eBook, include a picture of the front cover or some other alluring image to show people exactly what they’ll get if they perform the action you want them to take (a picture really does speak a thousand words in these cases). For example:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-show-lead-magnet-on-pin
  • Make it readable – Make your pins as easy as possible to read/understand. People will be scrolling quickly past pins on Pinterest, so don’t expect them to take the time to digest whatever text you’ve included on your pin fully. Choose a font that is simple and clear; a color which stands out against your pin’s images/background, and text that is large enough to be readable in a user’s Pinterest feed (i.e., before they’ve clicked on it to view it in more detail).

  • Understand key attributes – Some pins naturally perform better than others. It isn’t just a matter of luck; these pins nearly always include characteristics or features which have been found to perform better on Pinterest. Take some of the following, for example:

  • Pins with red images get more repins than those with blue.
  • The optimal amount of whitespace on a pin’s background is less than 30%. Above 40% and the number of repins drops between 200%-400%.
In addition to the links above, it’s worth checking out the following short article if you’re interested in creating the most effective pin possible (it’s an interesting read): This is the Perfect Pinterest Picture, According to Science.
  • Pre-populate your pin descriptions – I cover how important it is to enable social sharing on your blog later here, but an essential part of optimizing your pin is to ensure you’ve added a default description which gets added to Pinterest when people save a pin directly from your blog.

    Don’t expect someone who is pinning your image to add a good description or to use the keywords that will best promote your it, instead, create this beforehand and save it so that your pin automatically includes this description when pinned.

    I use the Social Pug plugin to achieve this, allowing me to add a pin description when I’m writing a blog post. It provides the following helpful interface at the bottom of the WordPress page that is used to write posts:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-provide-default-pin-description

Remember to create a description that is effective for both Pinterest and the people who will be looking at your pin. You need to find a balance between adding keywords (I cover these here) to make it as relevant as possible to a user’s search query, but you also need to make it interesting and informative to make a reader want to click through to read your content. The best description will strike a balance between these two requirements.

  • Protect your pins – Unfortunately, pin theft exists, so you should protect your pins by including your website’s name/logo on them (see the image below for an example of how I do it).

    Branding your pins isn’t always enough to stop it, but it’s better than a having a generic pin which can’t easily be identified as your intellectual property. I had this recently with one of my pins – a follower saved it and re-uploaded it except with a link that directed to their website – very cheeky! Thankfully Pinterest is fantastic at resolving this (see how here), and they removed it very quickly (thanks, Pinterest!).

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  1. Add a Call-To-Action to Your Pin/Description

A call-to-action (CTA) is something which prompts someone to complete an action, for example, a button on your blog which says, “Click here to subscribe.”

There are some situations where you aren’t allowed to add a CTA on Pinterest, for example, you can’t add a CTA to the image of a Promoted Pin (you can add it in the pin’s description, however).

You should try to use a CTA wherever you can on non-promoted pins to drive as much engagement as possible, so this means on the image itself…

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-call-to-action-pin-image

…and in the description:

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  1. Don’t Forget to Add Links to Pins

When you manually add a pin to Pinterest to promote a blog post or article, make sure you provide a link back to the original content with the pin. It sounds basic, but forgetting this will make your pin essentially worthless from a traffic perspective, as even if you include your URL on the image itself, it is unlikely that someone will manually type it in and search through your blog for the content you’re promoting.

You need to make it as easy as possible for people to do what you want them to do.

  1. Create Multiple Pins for Every Post

Don’t stop at one pin for each of your blog posts, create as many as you can. How many exactly is up to you, and it obviously depends on the amount of time you can invest, but the more the better to increase the visibility of the specific post you’re promoting and your Pinterest profile as a whole.

Use different types of images, different pin descriptions and try out different keywords to increase your reach by as much as possible.

The bottom line: the more pins you have, the more traffic you’ll get from Pinterest.

  1. Make Social Sharing as Simple as Possible

It’s a great idea to leverage your existing traffic to grow your social media following. One excellent way to do this with Pinterest (and for each of the other social networks) is through the use of social-sharing buttons.

I use the Social Pug plugin on my blog to add social sharing buttons to each of my blog posts, and I use the AccessPress Pinterest plugin to add ‘Pin It’ buttons to each of my blog’s key images. I cover these two options in detail and show you how to install them on a blog here.

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-social-pug-media-buttons

Steps to Increase Relevance

Given that Pinterest functions as a search engine, the best way to get your content in front of as many eyes as possible is to help it get found quickly and easily. The steps below will help boost your pin’s relevance to increase its visibility for people who will be most interested in it.

  1. Don’t Forget to Use Keywords

I’ve already covered the importance of adding keywords to your pin descriptions, but there are other places that you also need to include them in your profile. These include:

  • Your Pinterest name – 30 characters available.
  • Your ‘About You’ section – 160 characters available.

For example:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-keyword-locations

Other places to include keywords on your Pinterest profile are as follows:

  • Your board names – 180 characters available – find a balance between being readable and enticing, versus too-keyword loaded and spammy which will put potential visitors off.
  • Your board descriptions – 500 characters available.

For example:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-other-keyword-locations

I focus on both popular and long-tail keywords for my pins, usually creating two different versions of each pin to focus on both types of keyword to try and increase my traffic from Pinterest by as much as possible.

As I mentioned before, you need to strike a balance between adding keywords and keeping the text as readable and interesting as possible. Try to avoid ‘keyword stuffing,’ where you add too many keywords to the point it isn’t readable by human visitors and appears spammy.

So how do you find these keywords? I’ll show you my approach below.

How to Find Keywords on Pinterest

I use Pinterest’s Ads interface to find keywords – it’s super simple, and you don’t need to spend any money running ads to use it. Let me show you how to do it:

  1. Hover over the ‘Ads’ link in the toolbar, and select ‘Create ad’ from the dropdown that appears.
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  1. Don’t worry too much about the page that appears. The only value which is required is the ‘Campaign name’ – I’ve opted for ‘Test’ as per the image below.
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  1. Once you’ve entered a random campaign name, press the red ‘Create campaign and continue’ button at the bottom of the screen.
  1. Scroll down to the section called ‘Add keywords’ – this is the part we’re interested in. Enter a search term into the search box and Pinterest will tell you how many monthly searches that term receives – this is an excellent way to gauge the popularity of any keywords that you want to use.
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My recommendation: continually test everything. Create two versions of the same pin with different keywords – for example, try one with long-tail keywords, try another with the most popular keywords you can find – see which does best using Pinterest’s analytics feature and base future keyword usage on this.

  1. Know When to Use Hashtags

Pinterest recommends that you add no more than 20 hashtags to each pin, but is using this many going to provide any real benefit?

In my opinion, no.

Here are a few of the key things I’ve learned from researching hashtags on Pinterest:

  • As the hashtag feed adopts a chronological order, hashtags will benefit time-sensitive pins the most. If you’re posting something seasonal, for example, a pin related to Christmas, hashtags will be useful. If, however, you’re pinning something that will continue to be relevant for a long time, for example, a recipe pin, then hashtags probably aren’t going to add that much value, so stick to using only a few.
  • There is likely no value in going back and updating old pins with hashtags while Pinterest continues to sort the hashtag feed chronologically. Depending on how old these pins are, they’d appear so far down the feed that users would probably never see them.
  • Although it is improving, the hashtag search function on Pinterest is not as good as it is on other social networks, which is another reason why I recommend not using more than a few hashtags at most. Your content will be found much more easily if you stick with adding an enticing pin description which includes relevant keywords instead. You only get 150 characters for the pin description, so I think it’s better to prioritize adding non-hashtag text which we know gets found as expected when people search for it.
  • Too many hashtags can look unprofessional and spammy. That’s why I don’t include any hashtags on any promoted pins that I create.
  1. Use SEO-Friendly Filenames

Often overlooked, it’s a good idea to name your images in an SEO-friendly way (SEO stands for search engine optimization, and it covers the steps to improve a website’s ranking in the search engines). This applies to any image you add to your Pinterest profile, for example, pins or your profile picture, and to any images on your blog that are shareable via a ‘pin it’ button.

I try and get as descriptive as possible with my filenames. Check out the following example:

one percent intent supercharge pinterest pin filename example

Instead of using something non-descriptive like ‘image.png,’ I chose the following:

‘one-percent-intent-11-best-audiobooks-for-online-entrepreneurs-pinterest.png’

As you can see, I’ve added my brand’s name, the pin title which includes some keywords, and a reference to the face the image was created for Pinterest.

Search engines can’t see your image the way a human can, so it’s a good idea to give them a helping hand so they know what your pin is about. Although Pinterest does have a way of ‘reading’ pin images, I’d prefer not to rely 100% on the accuracy of this, so adding a descriptive filename is a logical step.

Steps to Increase Pinner Quality

Not only does Pinterest care about the quality of the content which you promote, but it also cares about your quality as a pinner. Is your conduct representative of someone who places importance on sharing the best information and being as helpful as possible? The following steps will help Pinterest to view you as an asset on its platform, and will help your content achieve ranking and visibility which is reflective of this:

  1. Pin Regularly

It’s important to pin every day consistently – you can’t expect growth on Pinterest if you post the odd pin every now and again. Buffer saw a 150% increase in engagement from upping their previous 1-2 pins per day to 10 times per day, so quantity is a deciding factor in the profiles which flourish.

MediaPost takes this to another level and says that if you want to see results, you should post between 15-30 pins per day. I usually pin more than 30 times per day, and this has definitely worked to grow my Pinterest when combined with the other steps in this post.

When it comes to pinning regularly, it’s worth remembering the following:

  • You shouldn’t put your pins out in one solid block, i.e., pinning 15 times in one go on a particular day. Instead, regularly pin throughout the day (I take the number of pins I want to achieve for a specific day, e.g., 30 pins, and divide it across how many hours I can be active that day and available to pin, e.g., 14 hours, so I would need to average around 2 pins per hour).

    Pinning throughout the day will help you reach different audiences given that people will be accessing Pinterest from various locations and time zones.

  • Any new pins that you add should be pinned to the most relevant board first. Don’t forget that the first five pins receive a distribution boost too, so use this opportunity to pin the content that you want to share the most.

  • Don’t spam – For example, don’t share one pin ten times in a row to different boards, which usually happens with new pins that people are excited to share – I’ve been very guilty of this previously.

    A better approach is to spread it evenly throughout the day to increase reach and effectiveness, and also to stop Pinterest flagging your account for spam (this DOES happen).

  • Given that Pinterest wants you to promote high-quality, popular content, I make a point of ensuring that the bulk of my repins come from pins that already have a high level of engagement.

    A website like Repinned! is great for finding popular pins from other pinners that you can repin. For the pins I’ve created, I use Pinterest’s Analytics feature to see the version of my pin that has the most saves, clicks or comments, and I prioritize repinning this specific version over any others with lower engagement figures.

    Completing this step is a great way to increase the quality of your pins, and I’d recommend that you start doing this today as the Pinterest algorithm hugely favors it. Remember to repin your content AND other people’s content to get as much reach as possible – the best pinning strategy will include both.

  • If you’re using a scheduling tool like Tailwind (see my full review of Tailwind) or Boardbooster, remember to still add pins manually. Pinterest is a social network, and it values actual time spent using and helping with growing the platform, so you won’t be doing yourself any favors if your only interaction with it is through a separate scheduling tool.

  1. Use Pinterest Analytics

Pinterest Analytics helps you make more informed choices about the content you share on the platform. For example, you can see what content your audience is engaging with most and what isn’t working, and choose to either do more of these things or less going forward. Pinterest displays this information in helpful graphs to make it as easy as possible for you to see everything you need to know about your profile, for example:

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one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-analytics-graphs

You’ll need a business profile and to have claimed your website to get access to Pinterest Analytics (check out step one and step two of this guide for more information).

  1. Pin New Content

Pinterest considers any new pin (regardless of whether it promotes a recent article or an old article) as new content.

This new content provides a small ranking boost to your profile, so it’s a good idea to create new blog posts or offer extra products/services that you can create new pins for and to keep designing new pins for your existing content to take advantage of this boost. You should also create as many news pins as possible around topics that are already popular, so jump into Pinterest’s Analytics or use Repinned! to see what people are already engaging highly with and create new pins around this.

Remember: new content to expand reach + extra pins to keep your audience engaged + a ranking boost from Pinterest = Win-win-win!

  1. Keep Your Boards Focused

If you’re a food blogger, having a fashion board doesn’t make much sense (unless you’re showing clothes made of food, I guess!?).

Try to keep your boards as focused as possible to content that is directly, or at the very least mostly, related to the content on your blog. If you’re struggling to find a link between a specific board and your main topic, it probably doesn’t belong there. You want Pinterest and any visitors to your profile to be 100% clear on what your profile is all about.

Keep a separate, personal account, or use a secret board on your primary account for unrelated content such as general hobbies/interests.

  1. Have a ‘Best of’ Board

It’s a great idea to add a ‘best of’ board to your Pinterest profile. This is where you can showcase pins related to your blog’s best content or your business’s top products and services. Make sure this board is on-brand and that it instantly lets visitors to your profile know exactly what you, your brand and your blog are all about.

Pinterest allows you to add this board as part of a showcase of a maximum of five boards (see how to add it here). With five showcase slots available, you can choose to add a feature board of your blog’s content to the first slot, followed by the four boards that you get the most engagement from (check this using Pinterest Analytics).

  1. Start Your Own Group Boards

Group boards can be a great way to increase engagement on your content and to help position yourself as an expert in your field.

You can easily convert any of your existing boards into a group board. Just go to the board in question, click the button shown below beside your profile picture and choose the people you want to join your board as collaborators.

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-how-to-start-group-board
  1. Interact With Others

You’ll get more out of Pinterest when you start engaging with its content consistently. In addition to regularly pinning, having a ‘best of’ board and starting group boards, this means doing things like:

  • Following as many popular boards and people as possible that are related to your profile’s content (this has the added benefit of filling your profile’s home feed with relevant content that you can repin to share with your audience).
  • Showing that you’ve tried a pin and telling people how it went.
  • Commenting on any pins that you find valuable.

Do anything that gets your profile seen by as many people as possible, but do it in a non-spammy way, as this is essential if you want to get as much real engagement on Pinterest as possible. This means avoiding things like follow exchanges or share exchanges, which are essentially shortcuts which don’t provide any meaningful levels of engagement and interaction.

  1. Don’t Worry Too Much About Your Follower Count

Unlike other social networks such as Facebook or Instagram, the number of followers you have isn’t that important on Pinterest. Why? It comes down to the fact that it operates like a search engine more than it does like a social network (the quality and relevance of your pins is much more important, which is why I’m able to get over 100k monthly unique views with less than 1000 followers).

Don’t get me wrong, your follower count is still of some importance, because the more followers you have, the more home feeds your content can potentially be placed in to provide early engagement.

The best approach from a blog or website traffic perspective is to create stunning pins which people can find and engage with as easily as possible. That’s what the 21 steps in this guide will help you with – followers are just an added bonus that will come along naturally if you follow them.

Other Steps to Expand Reach

The steps below don’t fit quite as nicely into the categories above as I’d like, so I’ve added another one for them. These steps are just as beneficial as those above (especially in the case of using Promoted Pins), and they present further opportunities to supercharge your Pinterest profile.

  1. Use Promoted Pins

Promoted Pins is a feature which allows you to purchase paid advertising on Pinterest for your brand, your products, and services, or any affiliate products you’re promoting. It allows you to expand your reach well beyond your current group of followers or any group boards on which you’re active.

There are a few campaign options available, including;

  • Awareness – Pay to have people view your pin.
  • Traffic – Pay when people click on your pin and follow the link provided to your content.
  • App Installs – Pay when people install your app.
  • Video Ads – Pay when people watch a video pin that you’ve added to Pinterest.

You can see an example of a promoted pin below:

one percent intent grow pinterest blog traffic - promoted pin example

So why are Promoted Pins so good? Well, Pinterest claims that 50% of people have purchased a product after seeing one, and 61% of people have discovered new brands or products as a result of Promoted Pins. In addition, Pinterest has been shown to deliver $2 profit for every $1 spent on advertising, although this can often be much higher, with Ezra Firestone earning $41,254.34 from an investment of just $775.50 in Promoted Pins.

An added bonus? You’ll get free clicks from your Promoted Pins given that people will save them, and any clicks on the saved, non-promoted version of a pin will be free.

As a new blogger or someone who is trying to build their brand, they are an excellent way to increase exposure and engagement. Promoted pins is an entire topic by itself, so if you’re interested, I’d highly recommend checking out the following free guide: Pinterest Ads: A Simple Guide to Set You Up For Success.

  1. Run Competitions

Running a competition on Pinterest can be a great way to get people to engage with your profile. It isn’t as simple as thinking up an offer though, as Pinterest has some guidelines that you need to be aware of when it comes to creating/running a contest.

An example of a pin promoting a competition is shown below:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-run-competition

I recommend the following guide if you’re interested in running a contest to grow your brand: How to Run a Pinterest Contest.

If you’re struggling with Pinterest, the chances are that you’re missing a few of the steps above. As I mentioned before though, it’s important to be realistic and remember that growth on Pinterest is a marathon and not a sprint. I recommend picking a few of the steps above to start with, before gradually adding more and more until you reach a level of Pinterest engagement and traffic to your blog that you’re happy with.

Ignore the false promises and avoid the lure of taking shortcuts, and instead focus on consistently building your reach and engagement from today via good, honest hard work. It’s the only way, and it’s the main requirement for anyone wanting to know how to make money on Pinterest.

Let me know in the comments section what has worked and what hasn’t worked for you. I’ll also try to answer any questions you have, so drop me a comment below and I’ll try to point you in the right direction.

Thanks,

– Jonathan

21 Steps to Supercharge Your Pinterest Marketing

Pinterest is widely regarded as being one of the best sources of traffic for bloggers, with around 5% of all online referral traffic coming from the platform. In addition, it has been found to be 80% more viral and 3x more effective at lead generation than Twitter, so from a blog/business perspective you really can’t afford not to master Pinterest.

I know from personal experience, however, that Pinterest can be a tricky beast to tame. There seems to be conflicting advice everywhere, and promises of instant, massive blog traffic growth from a few too-good-to-be-true ‘secrets’ never seem to be too far away.

Trust me; I reckon I’ve tried all the Pinterest tips and tricks available, from high-volume pinning to testing out strategies combining manual and scheduled pinning, nothing seemed to work to increase my profile’s reach and engagement massively, and I couldn’t find a single example of how to make money on Pinterest that actually worked for me.

Thankfully, I’ve found that you can adopt a ‘back to basics’ approach which works. Perhaps the first step below should be to be realistic, as the most important thing you need to realize is that it’s a marathon and not a sprint. There is no such thing as overnight success in any endeavor, and provided you follow the steps below and stay consistent, then you too should be able to grow a Pinterest profile capable of producing the monthly views and blog traffic of some of the profiles you and I both envy.

(Please note: I’m not saying I’m a Pinterest expert by writing this post (far from it!), but I have done a LOT of research by reading pretty much every ‘Pinterest for bloggers’ guide out there, and my profile’s reach is steadily growing. If discussing my experience and what I’ve learned can help even one of my readers save time and make them feel more confident about Pinterest, then I view that as a success!).

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-icon

Essential Information in 2018 – What do you need to know?

If you’ve read anything about Pinterest recently, you’ve probably heard about the algorithm update which took effect in 2018.

As a bit of background information, Pinterest introduced a feature known as the ‘smart feed’ in the backend of 2018 (this is just a fancy term for the home feed that shows on your profile’s homepage). It’s called ‘smart’ because it uses an algorithm to ensure that any pins displayed on the home feed are as relevant as possible for a user based on certain criteria, for example, their interests, what they searched for on Pinterest previously, and how ‘quality’ a pin is considered to be, etc.

It isn’t uncommon for the algorithm that drives this to be updated, and that’s what has happened in 2018.

Now, Pinterest is never going to come out and tell us precisely what the algorithm looks for (they’re a business after all, and they need to protect their intellectual property). We can, however, piece together snippets from various sources including Pinterest employees, articles, and our personal experience to build a picture of what works on Pinterest. That’s what I’ve done for this guide.

There are four main areas you need to look at if you want to boost your Pinterest profile’s reach and engagement, and to ultimately get traffic to your blog using the platform. They form the foundations of how to make money on Pinterest.

These include:

  • Domain Quality – An assessment is performed by Pinterest to determine the ‘quality’ of your website. It makes sense for this to be measured because Pinterest would prefer to boost the ranking of pins from authoritative and popular sites versus those associated with spam. Nobody likes spam or clickbait, so by weeding this out, Pinterest hopes (and can expect) to increase user satisfaction and loyalty on the platform.

  • Pin Quality – Nothing new here. Pinterest checks to see how much engagement your pins are getting. The more saves, clicks, comments and tries the better, and Pinterest takes note of this to boost the ranking and visibility of more popular content.

  • Relevance – It’s worth remembering that Pinterest functions as a search engine, so the top priority of the platform is to display pins that relate directly to a user’s interests or their specific search query.

  • Pinner Quality – Pinterest cares more about the quality of the pins you promote on the platform than the quantity. The visibility of your pins will take a hit if you consistently promote low-quality content with little engagement versus more popular content.

I’m going to make it super simple for you and show you the 21 steps that you need to take to meet each of the requirements above.

My advice? Don’t overwhelm yourself – pick a few steps and gradually add more as time goes on. Consistency is the key here.

Let’s dive in…

How to make money on Pinterest:

Learn the steps to get more traffic to your blog, website or business using Pinterest. Both beginner & established Pinterest users will learn helpful tips and tricks and secret hacks on how to grow blog traffic, and how to increase domain quality, pin quality, relevance and pinner quality. Learn how to optimize your pins using SEO & keywords to improve engagement and receive comments, saves and clicks, and find out how important promoted pins are to help boost your blog’s traffic strategy.

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Steps to Increase Domain Quality

As with building a house, your Pinterest profile will be stronger if you build it upon the right foundations. The following steps will boost your domain quality on Pinterest and help you achieve some of the fundamental requirements of successful accounts:

  1. Set up a Business Account

The first step to increasing domain quality is to set up your Pinterest profile as a business account. Don’t worry; it’s completely free.

There are a few reasons why having a Pinterest business account is so important:

  1. You can’t promote products or services, for example via ads, without first agreeing to Pinterest’s Business Terms of Service.
  1. Having a business account allows you to show the name of your business/blog on your profile instead of the default first name and last name (see the image below), which looks far more professional from a business perspective and helps promote brand recognition.
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-increase-domain-authority-business-name
  1. Without a business account, you can’t access essential functionality such as Pinterest Analytics (to see how well your pins are performing), and Promoted Pins or Rich Pins (both of which will help you boost your profile’s reach and engagement).

You can convert from a personal to business account easily without any impact on your existing pins, boards or followers.

You can read about the specific steps here.

  1. Claim Your Website

Claiming your website is an essential step to boosting your engagement on Pinterest. There are a few reasons for this:

  1. Claiming your site is required to unlock Pinterest Analytics (in addition to having a business account as discussed above). This feature is critical to helping you make informed choices about the content you share. I talk more about Pinterest Analytics in Point 18 below.
  1. Once you’ve claimed your site, any pins that come from your blog will have your profile picture attached beside them which will help boost brand visibility and recognition.
  1. Your blog’s URL will now show directly on your profile (see image below). Visitors to your profile can directly follow this link to access your blog.
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-increase-domain-authority-claim-website

Find out how to do it here: How to claim your website on Pinterest.

  1. Use Rich Pins

Rich Pins take a standard pin and pump it full of additional, relevant information. There are a couple of types available:

  • Product Pins
  • Recipe Pins
  • Article Pins
  • App Pins

For example, look at the following recipe pin:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-increase-domain-authority-rich-pins

See all that extra information like cooking time, ingredients, and even the title of the recipe at the top of the pin? You wouldn’t get that on a standard pin.

All told, this additional information will help your pins stand out more against all the noise on Pinterest. Another advantage? Rich Pins extract metadata from your website, meaning that if you change information, for example, the price of a product, the revised price is automatically updated on the Rich Pin.

Find out how to add them here: How to enable rich pins for your blog/website.

Steps to Increase Pin Quality

The quality of your pins is hugely important on Pinterest – you can’t expect people to share something that looks amateur or is full of grammar/spelling mistakes. Complete the following steps to increase the number of saves, clicks, comments and tries on your pins:

  1. Optimize Your Pins

I can’t stress enough how important it is to focus on pinning high quality pins. First impressions count, and if you want your pin to stand out and receive more saves, clicks and comments than the other pins in a user’s feed, there are a number of things you need to do. These include:

When creating pins:

  • Focus on quality – Don’t create pins for the sake of it, but instead focus on providing as much value as possible. The following quote sums up what you need to aim for: “The best Pins represent the best ideas – they’re inspirational and actionable. Create Pins that have a clear audience, and are engaging for that audience” (source).

  • Don’t rush it – Spend as much time as possible creating a pin that you’re proud of. You can use a service like Canva to produce high-quality pins online, they even provide royalty free images, and you can apply filters to quickly and easily modify how your pin looks.

  • Avoid horizontal pins – The general feeling is that you should avoid horizontal pins at all costs – even Pinterest admits that vertical pins work better.

    Horizontal pins won’t show in full on a user’s feed, and if someone needs to click a pin to see it fully and to understand it, well, that’ll be too much hassle. Most group boards prohibit horizontal pins anyway, so make it as easy as possible on yourself and others and stick to vertical pins only.

  • Size matters – There has been a trend recently of creating long, vertical pins that occupy as much space as possible in a Pinterest visitor’s feed, with the general feeling being that these will get the most attention (I have created several pins known as ‘giraffe’ pins – i.e., very tall and thin). Pinterest, however, states that it prefers an aspect ratio of 2:3 for vertical pins (typically 600px wide by 900px high).

    Longer pins will now be cut-off in the feed meaning the entirety of the pin won’t show unless it’s clicked on, and the Pinterest algorithm will reduce how often these pins appear on mobile devices unless they have significant levels of engagement.

    I’m personally sticking to 600px x 900px pins going forward, and I’ll be remaking my existing ‘giraffe’ pins to match Pinterest’s preferred size.

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-optimal-preferred-pin-size
  • Inspire action – Boost the effectiveness of your pins by creating headlines and sub-headlines that people can’t help but engage with. Check out the following guide for tips on writing headlines (yes…I know it’s written specifically for articles, but the tips can easily apply to Pinterest pins too): The Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Powerful Headlines.

    Make people want what you’re offering too. If your pin is promoting a free guide or eBook, include a picture of the front cover or some other alluring image to show people exactly what they’ll get if they perform the action you want them to take (a picture really does speak a thousand words in these cases). For example:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-show-lead-magnet-on-pin
  • Make it readable – Make your pins as easy as possible to read/understand. People will be scrolling quickly past pins on Pinterest, so don’t expect them to take the time to digest whatever text you’ve included on your pin fully. Choose a font that is simple and clear; a color which stands out against your pin’s images/background, and text that is large enough to be readable in a user’s Pinterest feed (i.e., before they’ve clicked on it to view it in more detail).

  • Understand key attributes – Some pins naturally perform better than others. It isn’t just a matter of luck; these pins nearly always include characteristics or features which have been found to perform better on Pinterest. Take some of the following, for example:

  • Pins with red images get more repins than those with blue.
  • The optimal amount of whitespace on a pin’s background is less than 30%. Above 40% and the number of repins drops between 200%-400%.
In addition to the links above, it’s worth checking out the following short article if you’re interested in creating the most effective pin possible (it’s an interesting read): This is the Perfect Pinterest Picture, According to Science.
  • Pre-populate your pin descriptions – I cover how important it is to enable social sharing on your blog later here, but an essential part of optimizing your pin is to ensure you’ve added a default description which gets added to Pinterest when people save a pin directly from your blog.

    Don’t expect someone who is pinning your image to add a good description or to use the keywords that will best promote your it, instead, create this beforehand and save it so that your pin automatically includes this description when pinned.

    I use the Social Pug plugin to achieve this, allowing me to add a pin description when I’m writing a blog post. It provides the following helpful interface at the bottom of the WordPress page that is used to write posts:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-provide-default-pin-description

Remember to create a description that is effective for both Pinterest and the people who will be looking at your pin. You need to find a balance between adding keywords (I cover these here) to make it as relevant as possible to a user’s search query, but you also need to make it interesting and informative to make a reader want to click through to read your content. The best description will strike a balance between these two requirements.

  • Protect your pins – Unfortunately, pin theft exists, so you should protect your pins by including your website’s name/logo on them (see the image below for an example of how I do it).

    Branding your pins isn’t always enough to stop it, but it’s better than a having a generic pin which can’t easily be identified as your intellectual property. I had this recently with one of my pins – a follower saved it and re-uploaded it except with a link that directed to their website – very cheeky! Thankfully Pinterest is fantastic at resolving this (see how here), and they removed it very quickly (thanks, Pinterest!).

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-branded-pin-example
  1. Add a Call-To-Action to Your Pin/Description

A call-to-action (CTA) is something which prompts someone to complete an action, for example, a button on your blog which says, “Click here to subscribe.”

There are some situations where you aren’t allowed to add a CTA on Pinterest, for example, you can’t add a CTA to the image of a Promoted Pin (you can add it in the pin’s description, however).

You should try to use a CTA wherever you can on non-promoted pins to drive as much engagement as possible, so this means on the image itself…

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-call-to-action-pin-image

…and in the description:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-call-to-action-pin-description
  1. Don’t Forget to Add Links to Pins

When you manually add a pin to Pinterest to promote a blog post or article, make sure you provide a link back to the original content with the pin. It sounds basic, but forgetting this will make your pin essentially worthless from a traffic perspective, as even if you include your URL on the image itself, it is unlikely that someone will manually type it in and search through your blog for the content you’re promoting.

You need to make it as easy as possible for people to do what you want them to do.

  1. Create Multiple Pins for Every Post

Don’t stop at one pin for each of your blog posts, create as many as you can. How many exactly is up to you, and it obviously depends on the amount of time you can invest, but the more the better to increase the visibility of the specific post you’re promoting and your Pinterest profile as a whole.

Use different types of images, different pin descriptions and try out different keywords to increase your reach by as much as possible.

The bottom line: the more pins you have, the more traffic you’ll get from Pinterest.

  1. Make Social Sharing as Simple as Possible

It’s a great idea to leverage your existing traffic to grow your social media following. One excellent way to do this with Pinterest (and for each of the other social networks) is through the use of social-sharing buttons.

I use the Social Pug plugin on my blog to add social sharing buttons to each of my blog posts, and I use the AccessPress Pinterest plugin to add ‘Pin It’ buttons to each of my blog’s key images. I cover these two options in detail and show you how to install them on a blog here.

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-social-pug-media-buttons

Steps to Increase Relevance

Given that Pinterest functions as a search engine, the best way to get your content in front of as many eyes as possible is to help it get found quickly and easily. The steps below will help boost your pin’s relevance to increase its visibility for people who will be most interested in it.

  1. Don’t Forget to Use Keywords

I’ve already covered the importance of adding keywords to your pin descriptions, but there are other places that you also need to include them in your profile. These include:

  • Your Pinterest name – 30 characters available.
  • Your ‘About You’ section – 160 characters available.

For example:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-keyword-locations

Other places to include keywords on your Pinterest profile are as follows:

  • Your board names – 180 characters available – find a balance between being readable and enticing, versus too-keyword loaded and spammy which will put potential visitors off.
  • Your board descriptions – 500 characters available.

For example:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-other-keyword-locations

I focus on both popular and long-tail keywords for my pins, usually creating two different versions of each pin to focus on both types of keyword to try and increase my traffic from Pinterest by as much as possible.

As I mentioned before, you need to strike a balance between adding keywords and keeping the text as readable and interesting as possible. Try to avoid ‘keyword stuffing,’ where you add too many keywords to the point it isn’t readable by human visitors and appears spammy.

So how do you find these keywords? I’ll show you my approach below.

How to Find Keywords on Pinterest

I use Pinterest’s Ads interface to find keywords – it’s super simple, and you don’t need to spend any money running ads to use it. Let me show you how to do it:

  1. Hover over the ‘Ads’ link in the toolbar, and select ‘Create ad’ from the dropdown that appears.
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-how-to-find-keywords-1
  1. Don’t worry too much about the page that appears. The only value which is required is the ‘Campaign name’ – I’ve opted for ‘Test’ as per the image below.
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-how-to-find-keywords-2
  1. Once you’ve entered a random campaign name, press the red ‘Create campaign and continue’ button at the bottom of the screen.
  1. Scroll down to the section called ‘Add keywords’ – this is the part we’re interested in. Enter a search term into the search box and Pinterest will tell you how many monthly searches that term receives – this is an excellent way to gauge the popularity of any keywords that you want to use.
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-how-to-find-keywords-3

My recommendation: continually test everything. Create two versions of the same pin with different keywords – for example, try one with long-tail keywords, try another with the most popular keywords you can find – see which does best using Pinterest’s analytics feature and base future keyword usage on this.

  1. Know When to Use Hashtags

Pinterest recommends that you add no more than 20 hashtags to each pin, but is using this many going to provide any real benefit?

In my opinion, no.

Here are a few of the key things I’ve learned from researching hashtags on Pinterest:

  • As the hashtag feed adopts a chronological order, hashtags will benefit time-sensitive pins the most. If you’re posting something seasonal, for example, a pin related to Christmas, hashtags will be useful. If, however, you’re pinning something that will continue to be relevant for a long time, for example, a recipe pin, then hashtags probably aren’t going to add that much value, so stick to using only a few.
  • There is likely no value in going back and updating old pins with hashtags while Pinterest continues to sort the hashtag feed chronologically. Depending on how old these pins are, they’d appear so far down the feed that users would probably never see them.
  • Although it is improving, the hashtag search function on Pinterest is not as good as it is on other social networks, which is another reason why I recommend not using more than a few hashtags at most. Your content will be found much more easily if you stick with adding an enticing pin description which includes relevant keywords instead. You only get 150 characters for the pin description, so I think it’s better to prioritize adding non-hashtag text which we know gets found as expected when people search for it.
  • Too many hashtags can look unprofessional and spammy. That’s why I don’t include any hashtags on any promoted pins that I create.
  1. Use SEO-Friendly Filenames

Often overlooked, it’s a good idea to name your images in an SEO-friendly way (SEO stands for search engine optimization, and it covers the steps to improve a website’s ranking in the search engines). This applies to any image you add to your Pinterest profile, for example, pins or your profile picture, and to any images on your blog that are shareable via a ‘pin it’ button.

I try and get as descriptive as possible with my filenames. Check out the following example:

one percent intent supercharge pinterest pin filename example

Instead of using something non-descriptive like ‘image.png,’ I chose the following:

‘one-percent-intent-11-best-audiobooks-for-online-entrepreneurs-pinterest.png’

As you can see, I’ve added my brand’s name, the pin title which includes some keywords, and a reference to the face the image was created for Pinterest.

Search engines can’t see your image the way a human can, so it’s a good idea to give them a helping hand so they know what your pin is about. Although Pinterest does have a way of ‘reading’ pin images, I’d prefer not to rely 100% on the accuracy of this, so adding a descriptive filename is a logical step.

Steps to Increase Pinner Quality

Not only does Pinterest care about the quality of the content which you promote, but it also cares about your quality as a pinner. Is your conduct representative of someone who places importance on sharing the best information and being as helpful as possible? The following steps will help Pinterest to view you as an asset on its platform, and will help your content achieve ranking and visibility which is reflective of this:

  1. Pin Regularly

It’s important to pin every day consistently – you can’t expect growth on Pinterest if you post the odd pin every now and again. Buffer saw a 150% increase in engagement from upping their previous 1-2 pins per day to 10 times per day, so quantity is a deciding factor in the profiles which flourish.

MediaPost takes this to another level and says that if you want to see results, you should post between 15-30 pins per day. I usually pin more than 30 times per day, and this has definitely worked to grow my Pinterest when combined with the other steps in this post.

When it comes to pinning regularly, it’s worth remembering the following:

  • You shouldn’t put your pins out in one solid block, i.e., pinning 15 times in one go on a particular day. Instead, regularly pin throughout the day (I take the number of pins I want to achieve for a specific day, e.g., 30 pins, and divide it across how many hours I can be active that day and available to pin, e.g., 14 hours, so I would need to average around 2 pins per hour).

    Pinning throughout the day will help you reach different audiences given that people will be accessing Pinterest from various locations and time zones.

  • Any new pins that you add should be pinned to the most relevant board first. Don’t forget that the first five pins receive a distribution boost too, so use this opportunity to pin the content that you want to share the most.

  • Don’t spam – For example, don’t share one pin ten times in a row to different boards, which usually happens with new pins that people are excited to share – I’ve been very guilty of this previously.

    A better approach is to spread it evenly throughout the day to increase reach and effectiveness, and also to stop Pinterest flagging your account for spam (this DOES happen).

  • Given that Pinterest wants you to promote high-quality, popular content, I make a point of ensuring that the bulk of my repins come from pins that already have a high level of engagement.

    A website like Repinned! is great for finding popular pins from other pinners that you can repin. For the pins I’ve created, I use Pinterest’s Analytics feature to see the version of my pin that has the most saves, clicks or comments, and I prioritize repinning this specific version over any others with lower engagement figures.

    Completing this step is a great way to increase the quality of your pins, and I’d recommend that you start doing this today as the Pinterest algorithm hugely favors it. Remember to repin your content AND other people’s content to get as much reach as possible – the best pinning strategy will include both.

  • If you’re using a scheduling tool like Tailwind (see my full review of Tailwind) or Boardbooster, remember to still add pins manually. Pinterest is a social network, and it values actual time spent using and helping with growing the platform, so you won’t be doing yourself any favors if your only interaction with it is through a separate scheduling tool.

  1. Use Pinterest Analytics

Pinterest Analytics helps you make more informed choices about the content you share on the platform. For example, you can see what content your audience is engaging with most and what isn’t working, and choose to either do more of these things or less going forward. Pinterest displays this information in helpful graphs to make it as easy as possible for you to see everything you need to know about your profile, for example:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-analytics
one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-analytics-graphs

You’ll need a business profile and to have claimed your website to get access to Pinterest Analytics (check out step one and step two of this guide for more information).

  1. Pin New Content

Pinterest considers any new pin (regardless of whether it promotes a recent article or an old article) as new content.

This new content provides a small ranking boost to your profile, so it’s a good idea to create new blog posts or offer extra products/services that you can create new pins for and to keep designing new pins for your existing content to take advantage of this boost. You should also create as many news pins as possible around topics that are already popular, so jump into Pinterest’s Analytics or use Repinned! to see what people are already engaging highly with and create new pins around this.

Remember: new content to expand reach + extra pins to keep your audience engaged + a ranking boost from Pinterest = Win-win-win!

  1. Keep Your Boards Focused

If you’re a food blogger, having a fashion board doesn’t make much sense (unless you’re showing clothes made of food, I guess!?).

Try to keep your boards as focused as possible to content that is directly, or at the very least mostly, related to the content on your blog. If you’re struggling to find a link between a specific board and your main topic, it probably doesn’t belong there. You want Pinterest and any visitors to your profile to be 100% clear on what your profile is all about.

Keep a separate, personal account, or use a secret board on your primary account for unrelated content such as general hobbies/interests.

  1. Have a ‘Best of’ Board

It’s a great idea to add a ‘best of’ board to your Pinterest profile. This is where you can showcase pins related to your blog’s best content or your business’s top products and services. Make sure this board is on-brand and that it instantly lets visitors to your profile know exactly what you, your brand and your blog are all about.

Pinterest allows you to add this board as part of a showcase of a maximum of five boards (see how to add it here). With five showcase slots available, you can choose to add a feature board of your blog’s content to the first slot, followed by the four boards that you get the most engagement from (check this using Pinterest Analytics).

  1. Start Your Own Group Boards

Group boards can be a great way to increase engagement on your content and to help position yourself as an expert in your field.

You can easily convert any of your existing boards into a group board. Just go to the board in question, click the button shown below beside your profile picture and choose the people you want to join your board as collaborators.

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-how-to-start-group-board
  1. Interact With Others

You’ll get more out of Pinterest when you start engaging with its content consistently. In addition to regularly pinning, having a ‘best of’ board and starting group boards, this means doing things like:

  • Following as many popular boards and people as possible that are related to your profile’s content (this has the added benefit of filling your profile’s home feed with relevant content that you can repin to share with your audience).
  • Showing that you’ve tried a pin and telling people how it went.
  • Commenting on any pins that you find valuable.

Do anything that gets your profile seen by as many people as possible, but do it in a non-spammy way, as this is essential if you want to get as much real engagement on Pinterest as possible. This means avoiding things like follow exchanges or share exchanges, which are essentially shortcuts which don’t provide any meaningful levels of engagement and interaction.

  1. Don’t Worry Too Much About Your Follower Count

Unlike other social networks such as Facebook or Instagram, the number of followers you have isn’t that important on Pinterest. Why? It comes down to the fact that it operates like a search engine more than it does like a social network (the quality and relevance of your pins is much more important, which is why I’m able to get over 100k monthly unique views with less than 1000 followers).

Don’t get me wrong, your follower count is still of some importance, because the more followers you have, the more home feeds your content can potentially be placed in to provide early engagement.

The best approach from a blog or website traffic perspective is to create stunning pins which people can find and engage with as easily as possible. That’s what the 21 steps in this guide will help you with – followers are just an added bonus that will come along naturally if you follow them.

Other Steps to Expand Reach

The steps below don’t fit quite as nicely into the categories above as I’d like, so I’ve added another one for them. These steps are just as beneficial as those above (especially in the case of using Promoted Pins), and they present further opportunities to supercharge your Pinterest profile.

  1. Use Promoted Pins

Promoted Pins is a feature which allows you to purchase paid advertising on Pinterest for your brand, your products, and services, or any affiliate products you’re promoting. It allows you to expand your reach well beyond your current group of followers or any group boards on which you’re active.

There are a few campaign options available, including;

  • Awareness – Pay to have people view your pin.
  • Traffic – Pay when people click on your pin and follow the link provided to your content.
  • App Installs – Pay when people install your app.
  • Video Ads – Pay when people watch a video pin that you’ve added to Pinterest.

You can see an example of a promoted pin below:

one percent intent grow pinterest blog traffic - promoted pin example

So why are Promoted Pins so good? Well, Pinterest claims that 50% of people have purchased a product after seeing one, and 61% of people have discovered new brands or products as a result of Promoted Pins. In addition, Pinterest has been shown to deliver $2 profit for every $1 spent on advertising, although this can often be much higher, with Ezra Firestone earning $41,254.34 from an investment of just $775.50 in Promoted Pins.

An added bonus? You’ll get free clicks from your Promoted Pins given that people will save them, and any clicks on the saved, non-promoted version of a pin will be free.

As a new blogger or someone who is trying to build their brand, they are an excellent way to increase exposure and engagement. Promoted pins is an entire topic by itself, so if you’re interested, I’d highly recommend checking out the following free guide: Pinterest Ads: A Simple Guide to Set You Up For Success.

  1. Run Competitions

Running a competition on Pinterest can be a great way to get people to engage with your profile. It isn’t as simple as thinking up an offer though, as Pinterest has some guidelines that you need to be aware of when it comes to creating/running a contest.

An example of a pin promoting a competition is shown below:

one-percent-intent-supercharge-pinterest-run-competition

I recommend the following guide if you’re interested in running a contest to grow your brand: How to Run a Pinterest Contest.

If you’re struggling with Pinterest, the chances are that you’re missing a few of the steps above. As I mentioned before though, it’s important to be realistic and remember that growth on Pinterest is a marathon and not a sprint. I recommend picking a few of the steps above to start with, before gradually adding more and more until you reach a level of Pinterest engagement and traffic to your blog that you’re happy with.

Ignore the false promises and avoid the lure of taking shortcuts, and instead focus on consistently building your reach and engagement from today via good, honest hard work. It’s the only way, and it’s the main requirement for anyone wanting to know how to make money on Pinterest.

Let me know in the comments section what has worked and what hasn’t worked for you. I’ll also try to answer any questions you have, so drop me a comment below and I’ll try to point you in the right direction.

Thanks,

– Jonathan

28 Rules You NEED to Follow to Supercharge Your Blogging Income.

Get your FREE checklist and email course to find how to consistently earn $1,000+ a month from your blog!

28 Rules You NEED to Follow to Supercharge Your Blogging Income.

Get your FREE checklist and email course to find how to consistently earn $1,000+ a month from your blog!

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Jonathan @ OnePercentIntentEmily Recent comment authors
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Emily
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Wow- this is hands down one of the best posts I’ve read about Pinterest! I’ve been on there for over a year now, and all the advice posts seem to be quite similar, but this is the ultimate post. You might want to think about creating all this info into a course or ebook!
Also, thanks for the tip on the Social pug plugin tip!

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